Digital Scholarship Unit Collections

Gunda Gunde
Welcome to the Gunda Gunde Manuscript Collection. Please note that development of the collection is still in progress.
Ottoman Empire Texts
Natalie E. Rothman
Animal Empire Collection
The Animal Empire collection consists of material found in the Dan Bender Zoo collection. The collection consists of movie posters, ads, trading cards, postcards, books, magazines and journals, related to Frank Buck (Frank Howard Buck (1884-1950), a renowned American hunter, animal collector, film director, actor author and producer.  The collection also consists of material related to zoo displays and architecture, catalogues and books related to zoo and animal collecting, photographs off various zoo related animals found in different parts of America and a board game. This collection was donated by Dan Bender and digitized and arranged by Amanda Wedge. The finding aid for the Dan Bender Zoo collection is available for download here. For more information or to schedule a research appointment, please  Contact Us.
UTSC Archives Legacy Collection
The UTSC Archives Legacy Collection had been stored in the basement of the Science Wing for nearly a decade before it was dusted off and moved to the UTSC Library in 2011. Many months of archival processing have revealed a collection that dates from the origins of the campus in the 1960s up to the mid-1990s, depicting and describing the evolution of the campus through extensive textual and visual records. The collection, which was compiled as a college archiving project by UTSC librarians throughout the thirty-year collection period, complements the archival holdings at the university's official repository, the University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services (UTARMS), and is particularly rich in student ephemera such as playbills, posters, and early and unofficial publications. The collection comprises over 16 meters of textual records, 1700 photographic items and dozens of maps, architectural plans and other artifacts. The archives are held in the UTSC Library and are made available upon request as a resource for researchers interested in student life, the history of the campus and the campus's unique and award-winning architecture, among other things. Digitization on this collection is well under way, and materials are regularly uploaded to Heritage UofT, a tri-campus collection of archival records, photographs, books, maps, drawings and audio-visual files that document the history of the university. The Heritage project is maintained by the University of Toronto Libraries' Information Technology Services, and current partners include UTARMS, the Fisher Rare Book Library and the UTM Library, as well as the UTSC Library. The UTSC Archives Legacy Collection has also been used as a teaching tool in HISD44, Nearby History: The Method and Practice of Local History, taught by Professor Christine Berkowitz. The course, which is structured around service learning, requires students to complete projects with community partners. Students who complete their service learning in the UTSC Library have traditionally worked with the UTSC Archives Legacy Collection, assisting with digitization and physical processing, while also conducting primary source research on topics as varied as noise pollution, student politics and campus architecture. The collection comprises over 16 meters of textual records, 1700 photographic items and dozens of maps, architectural plans and other artifacts. The archives are held in the UTSC Library and are made available upon request as a resource for researchers interested in student life, the history of the campus and the campus's unique and award-winning architecture, among other things. Digitization on this collection is well under way, and materials are regularly uploaded to Heritage UofT, a tri-campus collection of archival records, photographs, books, maps, drawings and audio-visual files that document the history of the university. The Heritage project is maintained by the University of Toronto Libraries' Information Technology Services, and current partners include UTARMS, the Fisher Rare Book Library and the UTM Library, as well as the UTSC Library. The UTSC Archives Legacy Collection has also been used as a teaching tool in HISD44, Nearby History: The Method and Practice of Local History, taught by Professor Christine Berkowitz. The course, which is structured around service learning, requires students to complete projects with community partners. Students who complete their service learning in the UTSC Library have traditionally worked with the UTSC Archives Legacy Collection, assisting with digitization and physical processing, while also conducting primary source research on topics as varied as noise pollution, student politics and campus architecture. Finding Aid: The finding aid for the UTSC Archives Legacy Collection is available here.For more information or to schedule a research appointment, please contact us.
Urquhart Collection
In 1966, Professor Emeritus Frederick Urquhart became one of three initiators and organizers of the zoology teaching and research program at Scarborough College, providing outstanding leadership until his retirement in 1977. An engaging lecturer, Urquhart was one of the few people at Scarborough to produce a highly successful television lecture series. Although his research interests were broad -- with four books, a monograph and 62 papers in refereed journals and countless scientific reports and popular articles relating to a wide range of biological subject matter to his credit -- Urquhart's first love was butterflies, an interest begin in childhood. Books and papers at school and in the library spurred his investigations and led him to ask the question: Where do monarch butterflies go in the winter? Urquhart's first attempt in 1937 to follow the monarch by marking individual butterflies met with limited success. But by 1940 he'd developed a method of tagging that worked and after the war he and his wife, Norah, whom he married in 1945, tagged thousands of monarchs, affixing a tiny label to the wing, reading "Send to Zoology University of Toronto Canada." In 1952 he issued the first appeal for volunteers to assist with the tagging and over the next 20-odd years thousands of people had participated. In January 1975 these efforts paid off when Ken and Cathy Brugger of Mexico City called to tell Urquhart they'd found millions of monarchs on the Neovolcanic Plateau about 240 km from Mexico City. In 1976 the Urquharts were able to see the spectacular sight for themselves. The Urquharts were honored for their work on monarchs and the Insect Migration Studies program they managed on several occasions. In 1998 they were presented with the Order of Canada. This is the highest award given to Canadian citizens in recognition of life long contributions to the country.
UTSC Photographic Services Collection
UTSC’s Photographic Services Collection boasts an impressive array of photographs that illustrate UTSC’s long and diverse history. The collection consists of slides (Series A), negatives (Series B) and photographs (Series C) taken by UTSC’s two campus photographers David Harford (1965-1994) and Ken Jones (1994-Present). This web exhibit is a representative sample meant to highlight the 7000 plus images present in the the collection. The exhibit covers the initial construction of UTSC in 1964 and 1965 to around 2002. Due to the wide variety of materials covered in the collection this exhibit is divided into five series; Student Life, Academic Life, Campus, Faculty and Staff and Community. Each is meant as a loose category to represent some of the facets of life at UTSC. Some aspects represented are: student theatre, student events, construction of the buildings on campus, graduation events, lectures, Faculty, staff and student portraits, summer camps and more. Each photo is accompanied by a description. The information provided is as detailed and accurate as possible given the resources available. The title is meant to provide context for understanding the image as a part of a larger collection. Each photograph was selected because of it’s evidential quality and how it serves as an example of life at UTSC. The digital collection was curated by Rachel-Ann Pisani with assistance from Vrishti Dutta and Mary-Ellen Brown. Finding aid: The finding aid for the UTSC Photographic Services Collection is available for download here. For more information or to schedule a research appointment, please contact us. Please note that the collection is comprised of print photographs, negatives and slides at this time. Digital photographs are currently managed by the UTSC Photographic Services Department.
Doris McCarthy fonds
The Doris McCarthy fonds was donated to the University of Toronto Scarborough in 2011 by the estate of Doris McCarthy (1910-2010), celebrated Canadian artist, author, teacher, and UTSC alumna. The fonds was donated along with 213 pieces of McCarthy's artwork, which are held by the Doris McCarthy Gallery at UTSC. The Doris McCarthy fonds was arranged and described in 2011. The collection contains over 9 meters of textual records, over 15,000 photographic items, and numerous other primary documents such as artifacts, architectural drawings, postcards, and an annotated personal library. There are many treasures within the fonds that speak to her influence as a pioneer for women in Canadian art and as a national cultural icon. Biographical highlights in the fonds include over five decades of correspondence between McCarthy and her best friend, Marjorie Beer (née Wood); diaries written by McCarthy between the ages of 12 and 90; personal artifacts and keepsakes; photographs of her family, life and travels dating back to the late 19th Century; and draft manuscripts of McCarthy's autobiographical publications. The fonds provides insight into her process as an artist and also includes hand-drawn architectural plans for Fool's Paradise, the home McCarthy designed and built on the Scarborough Bluffs. Finding Aid: The finding aid for the collection can be downloaded here. For more information or to schedule a research appointment, please contact us.